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April
25

Where to Display Your Indoor Plants

Indoor Plant Tips

If you're searching for a simple way to add natural beauty to your home and freshen your air, houseplants are an essential addition to your home. Houseplants absorb carbon dioxide and add oxygen to your home's air, working to remove toxins from your home. Our brokers know that having indoor plants also makes your home more inviting and appealing to potential homebuyers.  

However, it can be a little tricky incorporating plants into your home's existing decor. You also need to consider any specific needs for your houseplant, like whether it prefers a sunny or dark space. Here are some of the best spots to display your indoor plants. 

  1. Hang Plants in Front of Your Windows
    Perhaps you're short on floor space or don't have a lot of surfaces to devote to your houseplants. It's possible to add plants to your home without them taking up a lot of surface space. Add a hook to your ceiling or a plant hanger to your wall to hang your plants in front of a window. This is an excellent option for plants that thrive in a sunny environment. Plants with lots of volume and overflowing leaves will also add texture and visual interest to your home. 
  1. Use a Plant as a Centerpiece
    Searching for a fresh look for your table's centerpiece? Turn a houseplant into your dining area's focal point! Make sure to display the plant in a lovely planter or vase that coordinates with the room's existing decor. Or, if you feel like the plant on its own isn't enough, situate it on a decorative lazy Susan or a gorgeous tabletop tray. 
  1. Place the Plant by Your Home's Front Door
    A houseplant is an excellent piece of decor for greeting guests. Not only do houseplants instantly create welcoming decor, but they help remove odors from the air so that your home smells its best. Consider incorporating houseplants into your foyer or entryway decor for the odor-busting benefits and to make potential guests feel peaceful and at ease when they enter the home. 
  1. Situate Plants Around Your Fireplace
    During periods when you don't plan on using your fireplace or if you have a non-functioning fireplace, your fireplace's hearth and mantle are terrific spots for your houseplants to call home. Since a fireplace already adds a cozy touch to your home, make the space even more tranquil with your houseplants. You can place small houseplants and succulents along the mantle. Larger plants placed in decorative planters can adorn the hearth. Consider adding in other nature-inspired pieces, like decorative stones, seashells, and woven baskets, to add more interest to the space. 
  1. Devote a Corner to Your Houseplants
    If you have a free corner that you don't know how to utilize, transform it into an area for your plants. A metal beverage cart fits comfortably in the corner and can coordinate with practically any type of decor. You can use it to hold multiple plants or integrate the plants with other decorative items. Or, add some floating shelves to your corner walls and use them for smaller houseplants and succulents. 
  1. Decorate Your Windowsills
    Add visual interest to your windowsills by using them to hold succulents and small planters and vases. An additional benefit of housing plants with a windowsill is that it can help a room appear larger. Windowsills are a great home for plants that need sunny conditions to thrive. 
  1. Adorn the Top of Your Cabinets
    Cabinets that don't extend to your kitchen ceiling are a convenient spot for housing additional decor; they're an even better spot if you want to ensure that your kids and pets won't have easy access to your houseplants. This is also a fantastic spot for plants with vines or a lot of leaves that you need room to spread out. 

Want a home with more room for your plants or extra space outside for gardening? Contact us today to start your home search!

October
4

Pacific Northwest Fall Foliage Tour

Pacific Northwest Fall

Is it possible that Pacific Northwest scenery can get even more spectacular? While we love this area in all seasons, there's something extra special about the fall. See Washington and Oregon dressed up in their fall colors at these beautiful locations as recommended by our brokers.

  • Kubota Garden - 9817 - 55th Ave. S., Seattle, WA 98118
    Two words used most often by people to describe dog-friendly Kubota Garden: "hidden gem." Namesake Fujitaro Kubota and his son Tom envisioned their property as a public space to be enjoyed by all. In 1987, the City of Seattle purchased the land to complete that mission. More than 140 varieties of Japanese maples fill the garden with brilliant fall hues, while the waterfall and fish pond add a touch of Zen. Kubota Garden is open daily from sunrise to sunset, and admission is free.

  • Washington Park Arboretum - 2300 Arboretum Dr. E., Seattle, WA 98112
    Set in 230 lush acres on the shores of Lake Washington, the Washington Park Arboretum offers something different with each visit. Themed gardens, such as Rhododendron Glen and Azalea Way, highlight specific plants and landscapes. Take a canoe or kayak out on Union Bay for a chance to spot hawks, owls, and other magnificent birds. Kids have fun learning about nature while they complete the fall scavenger hunt. There's no charge to visit the Arboretum, which is open seven days a week from dawn to dusk. 

  • Discovery Park - 3801 Discovery Park Blvd., Seattle, WA 98199
    Framed by the Olympic Mountains to the west and the Cascades in the east, Discovery Park features some of the more spectacular scenery around. At 534 acres, Discovery Park is the largest city park in Seattle, and it provides a welcome oasis to the surrounding urban hustle and bustle. Surrounded by sand dunes, cliffs, and forest groves, you'll feel like you're in another world. Park hours are 4 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. daily.

  • Lincoln Park - 8011 Fauntleroy Way SW, Seattle, WA 98136
    Tucked inside West Seattle, one of the city's oldest neighborhoods, is Lincoln Park. While it's much smaller than many of the other city parks, Lincoln Park has a wide variety of attractions that make it a favorite destination for families. Features include 4.6 miles of walking paths, 3.9 miles of biking paths, picnic shelters, and a renovated play area. Fall is a prime time for spotting orcas, seals, sea lions and porpoise out on Puget Sound. Lincoln Park is open seven days a week from 4 a.m. - 11:30 p.m.

  • Pittock Mansion - 3229 NW Pittock Dr., Portland, OR 97210
    In 1853, 19-year-old Henry Pittock heeded the call to "go west, young man." After moving from Pittsburgh to Portland, Henry became a successful businessman and built Pittock Mansion. Today, the stately home serves as a museum dedicated to the legacy of Henry Pittock and the story of Portland's development over the years. The 46-acre grounds include trails for viewing trees, flowers, and panoramas of the city skyline and the Cascade Mountains. Pittock Mansion is open seven days a week from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. except for Tuesday, when doors open at noon. Admission is $12 for adults and $8 for ages 6-18.

  • Hoyt Arboretum - 4000 SW Fairview Blvd., Portland, OR 97221
    When Portland purchased 189 acres of land for $10 in 1922, the property was earmarked for development. Thanks to the efforts of key supporters, the land became the home of Hoyt Arboretum. More than 2,300 different tree species from more than six continents can be seen on the grounds, which is a greater number than any other arboretum in the country. Twelve miles of hiking trails provide opportunities to view Japanese maples, redwoods, flowering dogwoods, and many rare species. Watch for hawthorne fruits, magnolia cones, and snowberries, which take center stage during fall months. Hours are 5 a.m. - 10 p.m. daily, and there is no charge for admission.

  • South Park Blocks - 1436 SW Park Ave., Portland, OR 97201
    Don't have time for a day trip? Just head downtown to the South Park Blocks, a charming green space just north of Portland State University. The 12-block area was one of the city's first parks, dating back to 1852, and the tree-lined corridor is still a popular spot to enjoy a slice of nature. Mosaics, sculptures, and other artworks along the way add to the visual appeal. Park hours are 5 a.m. - 9 p.m. daily.

Whether you're looking for natural or urban delights, the Pacific Northwest has it all. Contact us at Coldwell Banker Bain for help with all your real estate needs.

August
16

National Honey Bee Day: Plants Bees Love on the West Coast

Honey bee gardensOne of the best reasons to buy a home is to have enough land to practice all your hobbies. Gardeners know it's crucial to have enough space for their plants to flourish. By choosing the right plants and nurturing them in the right ways, they make a positive impact that reaches far beyond their own home.

Never is this more obvious than when it comes to the humble honey bee!

Support Your Local Honey Bee Population with Bee-Friendly Gardening

National Honey Bee Day, also known as Honey Bee Awareness Day, is observed every August 21 in the United States. What better time than now to learn precisely what you can plant to attract bees and other pollinators? After all, the great majority of plants need pollinators like the bee to help them thrive!

When gardening to attract honey bees, remember that these little creatures have preferences. Flowers that consistently attract honey bees have visible pollen or nectar, making it easy for them to reach. Long, thin flowers don't appeal to bees, whose short tongues can't reach in. 

Hybrid flowers bearing big, showy blooms tend to have less nectar and attract fewer honey bees.

In addition to bees, hummingbirds and butterflies are common pollinators. Just because you see one type, it doesn't mean that the other types have been scared off. Plant a variety of flowers and you will get plenty of different pollinators. For those who are wondering, blue is widely believed to be honey bees' favorite color!

For a more bee-friendly garden, our brokers encourage you to consider these additions:

  • Bee Balm
    These colorful flowers have a unique "frilly" appearance and attract a wide range of pollinators. In addition to bees, you can expect to see more butterflies and even hummingbirds. Their distinctive dark green leaves hold a surprise: When crushed, they provide a surprisingly strong citrus-mint smell.

  • Joe Pye Weed
    Don't be put off by the name – this perennial plant is far more than a simple weed! Beloved by butterflies, in particular, Joe Pye Weed adds a pop of vivid pink, purple, and white all throughout late summer and fall. The dome-like flower growths are supported by lovely vanilla-scented leaves.

  • Yarrow
    Throughout history, Yarrow has been prized in many areas of the world as a plant associated with healing. These days, this perennial is appreciated as a drought-tolerant and colorful addition to any garden. It is highly attractive to both bees and butterflies. Beginning gardeners love yarrow because it is so easy to care for.

  • Delphinium
    This flowering plant adds texture to a garden thanks to its tall spires of colorful flowers. Those flowers come in a full spectrum of colors including blue, lavender, red, pink, purple, and white. A delphinium is sure to attract its share of admirers of all kinds – but it is particularly favored by hummingbirds.

  • Hardy Fuchsia
    With long, tubular flowers, the hardy fuchsia is another plant that calls out to pollinators of many different kinds. Bird-lovers enjoy planting it as a rest stop for hummingbirds and other feathered friends. Multicolored flowers are not uncommon with the hardy fuchsia, which usually blooms from late spring until frost.

  • Penstemon
    Bees can be attracted to the gently fragrant penstemon in surprising numbers, visiting its tubular flowers from far and wide. Butterflies often choose to alight there, too. Penstemon is well known among gardeners for its propensity to thrive in hot, sunny conditions. Beware that it does require regular watering.

  • Catmint
    A distant relative of the catnip plant, catmint won't be quite as compelling for your feline friends – bees, on the other hand, adore it. Bees are by far the most common catmint pollinator and will be visiting from late spring through the summer. Catmint's loose spikes of pink, lavender, or white can fit in many places in your garden.

Plant a few of these flowers and you're more likely to see honey bees buzzing along happily in your garden. Local, native plants often get lots of attention from bees. You can make their job easier by creating a water source in your garden. Bees use the water to cool their hives.

Looking for a new home with a yard perfect for putting your green thumb to the test? Contact us at Coldwell Banker Bain to discover real estate opportunities throughout the area.

Disclaimer: All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. All properties are subject to prior sale, change or withdrawal. Neither listing broker(s) or information provider(s) shall be responsible for any typographical errors, misinformation, misprints and shall be held totally harmless. Listing(s) information is provided for consumers personal, non-commercial use and may not be used for any purpose other than to identify prospective properties consumers may be interested in purchasing. Information on this site was last updated 08/13/2022. The listing information on this page last changed on 08/13/2022. The data relating to real estate for sale on this website comes in part from the Internet Data Exchange program of RMLS (last updated Fri 08/12/2022 8:34:57 PM EST) or Willamette Valley MLS (last updated Fri 08/12/2022 11:51:39 PM EST) or COAR/MLSCO (last updated Fri 08/12/2022 11:31:24 PM EST) or NWMLS (last updated Sat 08/13/2022 8:04:17 AM EST). Real estate listings held by brokerage firms other than Coldwell Banker Bain may be marked with the Internet Data Exchange logo and detailed information about those properties will include the name of the listing broker(s) when required by the MLS. All rights reserved. --

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