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July
12

Picnic Spots Throughout Seattle

Picnic Spots Throughout Seattle

With a city surrounded by water and mountains, is it any wonder that outdoor dining is so popular in Seattle? Pack a basket or grab some carryout and visit one of these amazing picnic spots around Seattle recommended by our brokers

  • Waterfall Garden Park - 219 2nd Ave. S., Seattle, WA 98104
    An urban picnic area may sound like an oxymoron, but Seattle is full of such unconventional delights. Waterfall Garden Park is tucked into an unobtrusive 60-by-80-feet spot in historic Pioneer Square. Until 1975, the site held the headquarters of United Parcel Service. Today, the charming park includes a 22-foot man-made waterfall and a dual-level patio with tables and chairs, making it a wonderful place for a lunch hour picnic or reading break. Park hours are 8 a.m. - 3:45 p.m. daily.

  • Green Lake Park - 7201 E. Green Lake Dr., Seattle, WA 98115
    The area around Green Lake Park features some of the most desirable Seattle homes for sale, and it's not hard to see why. Who wouldn't want to live just down the street from a beautiful three-acre lake surrounded by lush green space? The neighborhood is full of great restaurants, delis, and sandwich shops where you can pick up a picnic-friendly meal. Work up an appetite or work off some calories with swimming at the lifeguard-patrolled beach or a walk along the 2.8-mile path that circles the lake. Bring along a guidebook to identify the numerous birds and waterfowl you're sure to see. Green Lake Park is open 24/7.

  • Dr. Jose Rizal Park - 1007 12th Ave. S., Seattle, WA 98144
    Seattle has one of the most iconic skylines in the country. Take in some incredible views of downtown and Puget Sound during your picnic at Dr. Jose Rizal Park on Beacon Hill. With nearly 10 acres of grounds, including reservable picnic areas, the park can accommodate groups of any size. Be sure to bring Fido along and spend some quality time at the off-leash dog area. Park hours are 4 a.m. - 11:30 p.m., seven days a week.

  • Gas Works Park - 2101 N. Northlake Way, Seattle, WA 98103
    When someone in Seattle says, "Go fly a kite," people immediately head to Gas Works Park. The 19.1-acre site, once the home of the Seattle Gas Light Company plant, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Kite-flying on the park's spacious hills is a local ritual, while remnants of the original facility are incorporated into a play barn that's a favorite of families. Watch seaplanes land and take off from Lake Union against the backdrop of the downtown skyline. Gas Works Park is open daily from 6 a.m. - 10 p.m.

  • Washington Park Arboretum - 2300 Arboretum Dr. E., Seattle, WA 98112
    Nature is on display in all its glory at Washington Park Arboretum, a 230-acre extravaganza of gardens, wetlands, and wooded areas. The grounds contain 5,500 different plants from all corners of the world, including one of the top Japanese maple tree collections. Choose your favorite points of interest and create your own walking tour along the numerous trails. Print one of the seasonal scavenger hunts from the website and see how many items kids can find. Leashed dogs are welcome at the arboretum. Hours are dawn - 8 p.m. daily, and admission is free.

  • Carkeek Park - 950 NW Carkeek Park Rd., Seattle, WA 98177
    Washington state is known for apples because of spots like historic Piper's Orchard in Carkeek Park. Six miles of trails lead to the orchard, as well as spectacular views of Whidbey Island and the Olympic Mountains. The salmon-themed playground plays tribute to another notable product of the state. Check out the tide pool beach at low tide, when you can walk hundreds of feet out into Puget Sound. Park hours are 6 a.m. - 10 p.m. daily.

  • Woodland Park Rose Garden - 750 N. 50th St., Seattle, WA 98103
    With 2.5 acres filled with nearly 3,000 roses, Woodland Park Rose Garden is perfect for a romantic picnic for two or a delightful family outing. The garden is one of only two dozen American Rose Test Gardens in the country, displaying new hybrids before they're available to the public. Fun fact: since the garden went pesticide-free in 2006, the flowers have been used to feed animals in adjoining Woodland Park Zoo. Hours are 7 a.m. - 10 p.m. daily, and admission is free.

Picnics don't get more exclusive than the ones you hold in the backyard of your Seattle home. Have questions about buying or selling real estate? Contact us at Coldwell Banker Bain for cheerful and experienced help.

April
12

9 Reasons to Live Near a National Park

National Park

National parks are a true American treasure, handed down from one generation to the next.

The Pacific Northwest has so many wonderful national parks to visit, or better yet, live near. 

Stunning Crater Lake National Park is less than half a day's drive from Portland homes for saleOr explore 73 miles of Pacific Coast at Olympic National Park, roughly a two-hour drive from Seattle homes for sale

Our brokers share nine top benefits of living near a national park. Do some of these surprise you? 

  1. More Opportunities for Quality Family Time
    In today's families, both kids and parents are likely to have fast-paced schedules that have them moving in different directions. Even gathering around the dinner table can be hard. National parks offer accessible hours along with a wide variety of activities and attractions to suit everyone. Simply packing a picnic lunch to enjoy after a pleasant hike is a relaxing getaway. Admission fees are nominal, with several free days during the year, to fit any budget. And most parks are pet-friendly so that Fido can tag along!

  2. Low-Cost Outdoor "Health Club"
    Do you pay ever-increasing membership dues to a conventional health club to fight for a parking spot and wait in line for a treadmill or elliptical machine? National parks are incredible open-air "fitness centers" that aren't confined by four walls and a roof. Available activities range from hiking, mountain biking, and rock climbing in the summer to cross-country skiing, sledding, and snowboarding in the winter.

  3. Good for Mental and Emotional Health
    Physical fitness is only part of the equation for overall health. Spending time around nature has been proven to reduce stress and depression. In one study conducted in 2015, researchers examined the brain activity of two groups of people who took 90-minute walks, with one group in a natural setting and the other in an urban setting. The group from the outdoor setting had lower activity in the prefrontal cortex, which is where negative self-talk usually occurs. 

  4. Greater Earning Power
    According to experts, areas with national parks tend to have a thriving tourist industry, which in turn creates more jobs and better financial opportunities.

  5. Promotes Childhood Development
    In another revealing result from the OSU study, researchers discovered that kids under the age of 5 who lived near national parks were 10 percent taller than their peers who lived further away. While this is no guarantee for your child's height, there's no question that youngsters who have frequent exposure to nature gain physical and mental benefits, such as the development of cognitive skills that help with classroom learning.

  6. Less Risk of Natural Disasters
    When you respect Mother Nature, she returns the favor. Forested areas in national parks remain untouched, which allows the trees to protect water sources. In addition, the West Coast is vulnerable to flooding, landslides, and other natural disasters that endanger the environment, along with humans and animals. Protected habitats stabilize the surrounding land, reducing the risk of such devastating incidents. 

  7. Eco-Friendly Access to Nature
    There has been a long struggle finding a balance between outdoor activities that are enjoyable and accessible without causing damage to the environment. National parks provide a venue to spend time outdoors with minimal impact on our natural resources.

  8. Maintains Biodiversity
    Over the years, society mistakenly believed that natural resources were infinite. Fishing, hunting, mining, and other practices were conducted with no thought about their long-term effects. Sadly, a number of ecosystems and animal species are now endangered today due to this behavior. National parks create protection for wetlands, forests, and other ecosystems and endangered animals such as gray wolves. 

  9. Strengthens Friendships and Social Interactions
    How often do you attempt to plan an outing with friends and spend most of the time debating over dinner, a movie, or a ball game? A lively walk or vigorous bike ride on the trails of a national park are activities everyone can agree on. Being outdoors is also a great way to escape the pressures of daily life and focus on communicating with friends and loved ones.

Want to learn more about the parks around the Pacific Northwest? Contact us at Coldwell Banker Bain for more information.

October
19

Plan Your Visit to Seattle's Woodland Park Zoo

Woodland Park Zoo

Lions, tigers, and bears — oh my! Seattle is home to those species and so many more, thanks to the Woodland Park Zoo. Located in the Phinney Ridge neighborhood of Seattle, the zoo is committed to teaching guests the importance of conservation.

Woodland Park Zoo — 5500 Phinney Ave. N., Seattle, WA 98103

History of Woodland Park Zoo

Woodland Park Zoo is a beloved Seattle site, a destination that locals and visitors alike cherish. Our brokers included! After over a century of providing men, women, and children of all ages with an educational and immersive wildlife experience, it's hard to believe that once upon a time, this green space was once just a simple park along Seattle's Greenlake. Developed into a traditional English garden in the late 1800s by Englishman Guy Phinney, a large house, rose garden, pump house, and deer park once called this space home.

Seattle's first zoo was housed in at Leschi Park and owned by the Lake Washington Cable Railway. After Phinney's death, the City of Seattle purchased Woodland Park, and the animals were donated as the zoo's first residents when it was founded in 1899. The park was then divided into "Lower" and "Upper" Woodland Park after the construction of Aurora Avenue. It wasn't until 1967 that the first zones of the children's zoo were opened. Since then, Woodland Park Zoo has continued to grow, making room for countless new animals and educational and interactive opportunities!

Woodland Park Zoo Exhibits

So what can you and your family expect during your visit to the Woodland Park Zoo? The real question is, how can you experience everything in just a single day? With more than 1,100 animals from over 300 diverse species, the zoo features 92-acres of diverse natural habitats. Explore these amazing areas and discover the wonders of the animal world right in Seattle's backyard. Exhibits include:

  • African Savanna: Journey into the African Savanna for a view of lion, giraffe, hippos, zebras, ostrich, and monkeys.

  • Ambassador Animals: Meet the stars of the show — the Woodland Park Zoo ambassadors. Mammals, birds, and reptiles are ready to make your acquaintance.

  • Assam Rhino Reserve: One of the most popular exhibits, the Assam Rhino Reserve, also features the Asian Brown Tortoise and Demoiselle Crane to keep the one-horned rhino company.

  • Australasia: Enjoy a bird feeding experience at the Willawong Station after you spot snow leopards, emu, kookaburra, and wallaby.

  • Molbak's Butterfly Garden: Opening up again for the Spring season, Molbak's Butterfly Garden lets over 500 butterflies take flight. The Microsoft Pollinator Patio is open year-round.

  • Humboldt Penguin Exhibit: Don't let the name fool you, this penguin exhibit features Humboldt Penguins native to Chile and Peru.

  • Northern Trail: Hike into the chilly Northern Trail to the Taiga Viewing Shelter and Tundra Center to feast your eyes on Steller's sea eagles, snowy owls, bears, wolf, and elk.

  • Temperate Forest: Venture into the temperate forests, the same types of forests found in our region.

  • Trail of Adaptations: Watch unique nocturnal animals like sloth, meerkat, and Komodo dragons frolic around at night.

  • Tropical Asia: The Trail of Vines and Banyan Wilds showcase Asia's tropical locals like tigers, bears, pigs, otters, and orangutan.

  • Tropical Rainforest: Featuring an Outdoor Tropical Rainforest and Indoor Tropical Rainforest, this area is home to Jaguar Cove. Animals like lemur, gorillas, anacondas, monkeys, ocelots, and tarantulas are waiting to welcome you.  

Whether you're a long-time fan of the Woodland Park Zoo or this is your first visit, your family will love spending a day learning about wildlife from around the world.

The zoo has been welcoming back guests and has made several changes due to COVID-19. Plan your visit and learn about their latest policies on their website. 

If you're looking at Seattle homes for sale, you'll be excited to discover that the Woodland Park Zoo has a great relationship with its surrounding community. Contact us today to tour homes in this neighborhood!

September
14

Historic Sites You Can See Around Portland

Historic Portland Sites

When most people think of Portland, our lively culture, delicious food, and gorgeous Pacific Northwestern backdrop often come to mind. Though the City of Roses is far younger than many cities on the East Coast, Portland still has a rich, fascinating history that is worth exploring. Founded way back in the 1840s, Portland's diverse history is accessible through our many museums, landmarks, memorial sites, and protected areas. If you're searching for a glimpse into Portland's past, our brokers encourage you to visit these interesting historical sites.

  1. Shanghai Tunnels – 120 NW 3rd Ave., Portland, OR 97209
    Portland's Underground, also known as the Shanghai Tunnels are located in Old Town Chinatown. Beneath the buildings, a series of interconnected tunnels running all the way to the waterfront. Sadly, most of the tunnels have collapsed, preventing anyone from uncovering a clearer definition of their intended use. However, these tunnels are often sited through local lore to have been used to smuggle illegal goods from ships to the shore. 

  2. The Pittock Mansion – 3229 NW Pittock Dr., Portland, OR 97210
    The Pittock Mansion
    is a historic house museum that was once the home of The Oregonian owner, Henry Pittock. As he built his financial empire in real estate, banking, railroads, and more, his wife used their wealth to start and support countless organizations benefiting the people of Portland, including the Martha Washington Home and the Ladies Relief Society. The mansion was acquired by the city and restored to act as a museum dedicated to this interesting piece of Portland's early history.

  3. Waterfront Park – 98 SW Naito Pkwy, Portland, OR 97204
    Waterfront Park
    is a relatively new site for the city, with its ideation beginning in the early 1900s. It wasn't until 1974 that ground broke on this park, but it was well worth the wait as its been a popular social spot for Portlanders ever since. This park features many historical landmarks such as the Battleship Oregon Memorial, which was constructed to honor the retired ship that served our country in the late 1800s. The Founder's Stone is also on-site, which acts as a tribute to the city's founders who actually flipped a coin to determine whether the city would be named Portland or Boston. The Japanese American Historical Plaza is also within Waterfront Park, which honors the Japanese Americans of the Northwest who served in the United States military during World War II.

  4. Oregon Holocaust Memorial – 95205 SW Washington Way, Portland, OR 97205
    The Oregon Holocaust Memorial is located outdoors in Washington Park. This memorial was dedicated in 2004 to the many residents of Portland and Washington that have had relatives who died in the camps; their names are engraved on the memorial wall. A soil vault panel, filled with soil and ash from six camps, sits alongside bronze tokens representing the everyday objects left behind as individuals from across Europe were transported to the camps.

  5. Ankeny Plaza – 2 SW Ankeny St, Portland, OR 97204
    Ankeny Plaza
    was one of the first public spaces in Portland and contains a number of historical features. Located in Old Town Chinatown, this plaza is surrounded by buildings built in the mid-1800s and contains the oldest public art sculpture: Skidmore Fountain. Meant to act as a drinking fountain for men, dogs, and horses, this 14-ft bronze piece of art continues to be a public space where Portlanders and their animals can come to cool off.

Are you searching for an older, charming home in Portland that you can call your own? Our team can help! Contact us today to tour our listings of Portland homes for sale.

February
17

Tour Around Seattle: Sleepless in Seattle Filming Locations

Tour Sleepless in Seattle Locations

"You make a million decisions that mean nothing, and then one day you order take-out, and it changes your life."

Such is the story of a man and a woman in the iconic romantic comedy Sleepless in Seattle. This 1993 hit starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan.

A romcom that still holds a special place in our hearts nearly 30 years later, Sleepless in Seattle, places the Emerald City front and center on the silver screen. Our brokers suggest venturing to these seven Seattle hot-spots featured in Sleepless in Seattle.

  1. Pike Place Market — 85 Pike St., Seattle, WA 98101
    Scene: Sam's son, Jonah, first meets his dad's new girlfriend, Victoria, at Pike Place Market.
    Perhaps the most famous Seattle attraction aside from the Space Needle, Pike Place Market is a bustling center of culture located on a beautiful stretch of waterfront. Opened over a century ago, nine acres of space feature farmer's markets, crafts markets, seafood markets, food stalls, restaurants, shops, and more. Don't just grab a photo as a souvenir — be sure to stroll the alleyways of the market and taste everything!

  2. The Athenian Seafood Restaurant & Bar — 1517 Pike Pl., Seattle, WA 98101
    Scene: Sam and his friend, Jay, eat lunch while discussing relationships.
    Located within Pike Place Market, this restaurant and bar has a special plaque signifying the stool on which Tom Hanks' character sat in the scene. The Athenian has been in Pike Place Market since 1909, and you'll discover why when you try one of their fresh seafood dishes.

  3. Inn at the Market — 86 Pine St., Seattle, WA 98101
    Scene: Although they do not go into this boutique hotel, Sam and his friend Jay walk beneath the Inn at the Market's awning.
    Inn at the Market, located steps away from Pike Place Market, offers 76 rooms and suites providing visitors with direct access to the food, views, and culture found by the Seattle waterfront. If you're in town searching for Seattle homes for sale, stay at the Inn at the Market to get a true taste of the area.

  4. Lake Union — 860 Terry Ave. N, Seattle, WA 98109
    Scene: Sam and his son live on a houseboat, docked on beautiful Lake Union.
    This freshwater lake is a fantastic place for outdoor recreation, including kayaking, paddle boarding, and boating. Head out onto the water and admire the great Seattle skyline or sit along the shore and enjoy a relaxing picnic surrounded by the beauty of the Pacific Northwest.

  5. Gas Works Park — 2101 N. Northlake Way, Seattle, WA 98103
    Scene: Alone on his houseboat, Sam watches New Year's Eve fireworks over Gas Works Park.
    This 19-acre park is a perfect place for families to play. Gas Works Park is located on the north shore of Lake Union, allowing you to hit two scenic Sleepless in Seattle spots in one stop!

  6. Alki Beach — 1702 Alki Ave. SW., Seattle, WA 98116
    Scene: Annie secretly watches Sam and his son, Jonah, play on Alki Beach.
    Seattle's closest beach, Alki Beach Park, is roughly two-miles long, offering visitors and locals alike a place to enjoy the outdoors all year long. With great views of the Seattle skyline and Bainbridge Island, Alki Beach is a wonderful place to relax after a long day chasing the scenes from Sleepless in Seattle.

  7. Dahlia Lounge — 2001 4th Ave., Seattle, WA 98121
    Scene: Annie hires a private investigator who follows Sam to a location where he's having a date with Victoria. 
    Considered the quintessential Seattle restaurant experience, Dahlia Lounge is known as the epicenter of Seattle's local, organic, and sustainable food movement. This delicious dining destination opened by Tom Douglas offers fresh tastes from throughout the Pacific Northwest. Unfortunately, the original restaurant location, as seen in Sleepless in Seattle, has moved, which means it doesn't resemble the movie's scene any longer. Still, they have one of the best menus in the downtown area, making it a must-visit for your Seattle tour. Enjoy Dungeness crab cakes, local oysters, and their delectable triple coconut cream pie — without a private investigator spying on you as you eat.

Would you like to live near these famous Seattle locations? Contact us today, and we'll give you a tour through the best Seattle homes for sale.

October
7

Seattle Waterfront Fun - Pier 54

Seattle Pier 54

Since 1988 Pier 54 has become one of the top tourist destinations in the Seattle Waterfront. Famously home to the flagship Ivar's restaurant, the pier has become a symbol of Seattle and is a central location for a fun day on the waterfront. There is no doubt that our Brokers like to highlight how vibrant and fun a city Seattle is, and Pier 54 contributes to that atmosphere.

Waterfront Fun Begins at Pier 54 

Pier 54 is a familiar sight for commuters as it is adjacent to the ferry terminal that serves popular destinations such as West Seattle, the Olympic Peninsula, and Vashon Island. This was why it was considered such a prime location for some of Seattle's oldest businesses. These businesses include such Seattle originals as:

  • Ivar's Acres of Clams Seafood Restaurant
  • Ye Olde Curiosity Shop Museum and Gift Shop 
  • Simply Seattle Gift and Souveniers
  • Kidd Valley Burger and Shakes
  • The Frankenfurter Hot Dog Stand

While the eateries do brisk business with commuters waiting for their ferries, these businesses provide a place for visitors to fuel up and get ready for a waterfront walk.

Pier 54 Nearby Attractions

As a gateway to the entire waterfront. Pier 54 is next to some of Seattle's most popular tourist attractions. Pier 55 features a variety of shopping opportunities such as the Seattle T-Shirt Company and Frankly Sweets, but it all revolves around Argosy Cruises. Argosy provides sightseeing trips in the Puget Sound that includes historical tours, shore excursions, and even whale-watching opportunities. After these day trips, many visitors like to refresh themselves at the Eliott Oyster House on Pier 55. 

Alaskan Way Makes the Waterfront Come Alive

As tourists continue down Alaskan Way past the Seneca Street and UnIvarsity Way intersections, the waterfront opens up not only to higher traffic but also in terms of dIvarsity of opportunity. Pier 57 is the heart and soul of the waterfront and possibly the most fun you can have with a view of the Puget Sound. Along with a boarding point for City Sightseeing Seattle tour buses, there are opportunities to see the city from a higher vantage point at Wings over Washington. There is also a full and vibrant arcade called Miner's Landing that includes:

  • The Seattle Great Wheel (Giant Ferris Wheel)
  • Vintage Carousel 
  • Games and Prizes
  • The Crab Pot Restaurant
  • Ice Creamery
  • Pirate's Plunder Novelty Gift Shop 

Make it a Day at the Seattle Aquarium

The massive Seattle Aquarium takes up Piers 59 and 60 and has just as much fun packed into it. A visit to the Seattle Aquarium will allow you to learn more about the beautiful marine life that calls the Pacific Northwest home. Featuring Sea Otters, Octopi, and a beautiful luminous jellyfish exhibit, it is a great place to take the entire family.

Exhibits give little ones the chance to get up close and personal with some of the more gentle creatures of the deep. While bigger kids can marvel at the 120,000-gallon exhibit and 360 degrees underwater dome. All proceeds will go toward education and conservation of the Puget Sound's marine environment. 

A Walk To Remember

This is just scratching the surface of the opportunities for fun and relaxation that the area around the southern piers of Seattle's waterfront provides for visitors to the Emerald City. Just up the hill is the many businesses of the historic Pike's Place Market and the downtown area, offering endless exploration, leisure, and shopping opportunities. For those who want to continue their journey down the waterfront, It is a beautiful walk on a summer day that is often bustling will streetside merchants and performers. On the other side of the waterfront, the Bell Harbor cruise ship terminals await for those who have been inspired to seek an ocean voyage.

The Seattle Waterfront is just one part of the gorgeous city of Seattle. Contact us to start your search for Seattle homes for sale to find the Pacific Northwest home of your dreams.

September
9

Pike Place Market - the Heart of Seattle

Pike's Place

If Seattle is the heart of the Pacific Northwest, Pike Place Market is its soul. This bustling, energetic attraction in the core of the city is virtually its own neighborhood, serving as a top draw for tourists and locals alike. 

What makes Pike Place Market such a must-see spot in one of the country's most vibrant cities? Join our brokers as they take a deep dive into the history, tradition, and appeal of Seattle's iconic marketplace.

History of Pike Place Market

During the early 1900s, Seattle was making the transition from frontier town to an urban center. The rapidly growing population created a strong demand for fresh produce, dairy products, meat, and other food items from nearby farms.

Unscrupulous wholesalers took advantage of the situation, paying farmers next to nothing and selling the goods alongside the downtown waterfront at exorbitant prices. Thanks to a proposal from City Councilman Thomas Revelle, Seattle decided to create a public marketplace where farmers could sell directly to consumers.

The fledgling market, located on newly-named Pike Place, opened for business on August 17, 1907, making it one of the country's oldest continually-operated public farmers' markets. Permanent arcades were constructed to house the vendors along with an eclectic mix of artists, activists, and eccentrics who began to gather regularly.

"Save the Market"

Sadly, the internments of World War II led to most of the Market's occupants being forced away. In 1941, Italian farmer Joe Desimone purchased the arcades and temporarily resurrected the Market, but post-WWII suburban sprawl resulted in a severe business downturn.

The Market was on the docket for demolition in the 1960s until architect Victor Steinbrueck founded a movement to "Save the Market." On November 2, 1971, Seattle voters approved a measure designating Pike Place Market as a nine-acre historic district.

Pike Place Market Preservation and Development Authority

Today the Market falls under the management of Pike Place Market Preservation and Development Authority (PDA),  a non-profit public corporation chartered by the city in 1973. In addition to maintaining the Market's physical structures and supporting its businesses, the PDA is charged with providing residential housing and services for low-income people within the district.

As part of PDA's mission, Pike Place Foundation was established in 1982. During its lifetime, the Foundation has granted more than $30 million to support the Market's Senior Center and Food Bank, Childcare and Preschool, Clinic and other neighborhood services.

The Foundation's hallmark is its mascot, Rachel the Piggy Bank, "born" in 1986. This 550-pound life-sized bronze piggy bank, located under the Market's signature sign and clock, is a favorite spot for photo opportunities and donations. Rachel's cousin Billie has held a spot of honor on the Market's waterfront since 2016. Be sure to rub their snouts for good luck!

Notable Market Vendors, Restaurants and Shops

When it comes to shopping at the Market, you can find everything from soup to nuts. Some of the vendors have taken on celebrity status.

  • Coffee legend Starbucks has become synonymous with Seattle, and you can visit the Market location where it all began.
  • Even people who have never been to the Market know about Pike Place Fish Market, aka "where they throw the fish." Nearly every mention of Seattle on national TV includes a shot of the fishmongers tossing customer purchases over to the wrapping counter.
  • Watch the artisans at Beecher's Homemade Cheese, create their award-winning products, including the Flagship variety. Beecher's has become so popular that they opened an outpost in New York City's Flatiron District.
  • Fresh ingredients call for top-quality tools and utensils. Pick up some great new gadgets at the original location of gourmet kitchen store Sur La Table. 
  • Three Girls Bakery is not only the longest continually operating business in the Market, but it's also the first business licensed to a woman in Seattle.
  • In Sleepless in Seattle, Tom Hanks and Rob Reiner famously discuss tiramisu over clams and beer at the Market's Athenian Seafood Restaurant & Bar.
  • Pike Place Chowder's soup is the best on both coasts. The soup won the title of "Best New England Clam Chowder" at Westport, Connecticut's Chowdafest four years in a row.
  • Seattle restaurateur Tom Douglas claimed victory over Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto on Food Network's classic completion show. His empire includes popular Market eateries Etta's, Seatown Market Diner and Rub with Love Shack.

Seattle homes for sale may seem like a dream, but they can easily become your reality. Contact us at Coldwell Banker Bain for experienced help with all your Seattle real estate needs.

May
20

9 Things to Do in Tacoma on a Saturday

Tacoma on a Saturday
Tacoma is well-known for its lively culture, creative and friendly residents, and sophisticated options for dining, shopping, and nightlife. If you're searching for Tacoma homes for sale, you might wonder where to start when exploring first.

Since our jobs give us plenty of opportunities to learn about the area's hottest attractions, our Brokers offer this short list of nine things to do in Tacoma on a Saturday. 

Tacoma Breakfast

  1. Early-Morning Breakfast at Shakabrah Java: 2618 6th Ave. Tacoma, WA 98406
    Known as one of the best breakfast spots in town, Shakabrah Java is the perfect place for you to start your Tacoma adventure. It's busy on the weekends, so you'll want to get there bright and early. We promise that the giant pancakes, homemade corned beef hash, and great coffee make it well worth the early-morning alarm. 

  2. Spend A Few Hours Shopping on 6th Avenue: 6th Ave. Tacoma, WA 98406
    Once you've finished breakfast, spend a few hours browsing the shops on 6th Avenue. While we recommend you explore them all, some of our favorites include Cresent Moon Gifts, 9 Lives Vintage Wares, and Turntable Treasures and House of Records.

  3. Grab a Mid-Morning Pick-Me-Up at Legendary Donuts: 2602 6th Ave. Tacoma, WA 98406
    Our Brokers love making a run to Legendary Donuts for a mid-day pick-me-up, and we suggest you do the same! Stop by and grab one of the delicious concoctions that are handmade there every day.
    With exciting combinations like the Captain Jack Sparrow chocolate donut made with rum-infused frosting, and toppings including espresso beans, gummy worms, or even Captain Crunch cereal, you'll quickly understand what all the hype is about.

    Tacoma Arts Live / Pantages Theater
  4. Take In a Show at the Pantages Theater: 901 Broadway, Tacoma, WA 98402
    The Pantages Theater, part of the Broadway Center for the Performing Arts, as a new name, "Tacoma Arts Live." As a non-profit organization located in Tacoma, their goal is to energize the local community with live performances. Make Tacoma Arts Live a part of your next Saturday by attending one of their upcoming performances.


    Tacoma Shake

  5. Enjoy Lunch at Shake, Shake, Shake: 124 N Tacoma Ave. Tacoma, WA 98403
    For a casual lunch in a super-fun setting, head over to Shake, Shake, Shake for delicious burgers, hot dogs, and fries. Make sure you save enough room so you can have one of their delicious shakes. They come in a host of unique flavors, and if you're feeling feisty, you can even indulge in a famous boozy shake! 

    Tacoma Chihuly Bridge

  6. Walk across the Chihuly Bridge of Glass: Bridge of Glass, Tacoma, WA 98402
    The Chihuly Bridge of Glass is an addition to the Tacoma Museum of Glass and provides a pedestrian bridge to downtown Tacoma.  Just perfect for a Saturday walk in the city, the bridge crosses over major rail lines and links the Museum of Glass to Union Station and the State History Museum.

  7. Head Over to Happy Hour at Bob's Java Jive: 2102 S Tacoma Way Tacoma, WA 98409
    A day in Tacoma wouldn't be complete without a visit to the giant teapot-turned-dive-bar known as Bob's Java Jive. Here you'll find cheap drinks, friendly locals, and an unforgettable good time. This iconic building has been standing since 1927 and is a must-see for Tacoma visitors and new residents. 

  8. Dinner at Mandolin Sushi & Steak House: 3923 S 12th St, Tacoma, WA 98405
    After a full day of taking in the best of Tacoma, you'll be ready to sit down and enjoy a nice dinner. Our Brokers suggest you give Mandolin Sushi & Steak House a try as one of the last stops on your Saturday Tacoma adventure itinerary.  Start with some sushi from the extensive menu, then dive into a teriyaki entree, a hot stone pot, or a bento box combo. 

  9. Round-the-Clock Fun at Tower Lanes: 6323 6th Ave. Tacoma, WA  98406
    If you have any energy left after this amazing day, you can't go wrong with a stop at Tower Lanes. It doesn't matter what time you arrive since this bowling alley is open 24-hours a day! If bowling isn't your thing, you can also enjoy playing mini golf or billiards, or spend some time in the arcade or at the bar. 

Let Us Help You Find Your Tacoma Home

Tacoma Pier

It's easy to see there's no shortage of exciting things to do in Tacoma, and this list is just the beginning! If you're looking for a trendy hotspot to call home, you've found it. 

At Coldwell Banker Bain, we have our finger on the pulse of all of Tacoma's best neighborhoods. When you're ready to start exploring your options, contact us. We'll show you how easy home-buying can be with our team on your side.

Disclaimer: All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. All properties are subject to prior sale, change or withdrawal. Neither listing broker(s) or information provider(s) shall be responsible for any typographical errors, misinformation, misprints and shall be held totally harmless. Listing(s) information is provided for consumers personal, non-commercial use and may not be used for any purpose other than to identify prospective properties consumers may be interested in purchasing. Information on this site was last updated 08/13/2022. The listing information on this page last changed on 08/13/2022. The data relating to real estate for sale on this website comes in part from the Internet Data Exchange program of RMLS (last updated Fri 08/12/2022 8:34:57 PM EST) or Willamette Valley MLS (last updated Fri 08/12/2022 11:51:39 PM EST) or COAR/MLSCO (last updated Fri 08/12/2022 11:31:24 PM EST) or NWMLS (last updated Sat 08/13/2022 6:56:43 AM EST). Real estate listings held by brokerage firms other than Coldwell Banker Bain may be marked with the Internet Data Exchange logo and detailed information about those properties will include the name of the listing broker(s) when required by the MLS. All rights reserved. --

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