Articles Tagged "Parks and Recreation"

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July
25

Best Trails for a Sunrise Hike in Portland

Portland Hiking

Few sights can match the awe-inspiring experience of a sunrise over the spectacular natural scenery around Portland homes for sale, and there are plenty of great trails in the area that allow you to get a front-row seat for one of nature's most amazing displays. As an added bonus, hitting the trails early allows you to beat the crowds and leaves you plenty of time to tackle everything else you need to do in your busy day. Our brokers appreciate the natural beauty of Portland, and we've got all of the key details on some of the best trails for a sunrise hike around the city.

  • Kelley Point Park – N. Kelly Point Rd., Portland, OR 97203
    Located at the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia Rivers, Kelly Point Park has a long, interesting history. In the early days of Oregon's settlement, this land was viewed as a place to start a city. Instead, it eventually became a city park, where you can watch the sunrise over the rivers with a pleasant breeze at your back. The Kelley Point Loop trail makes it easy to traverse the park with a short, scenic 1.7-mile hike.

  • Powell Butte Nature Park – 16160 SE Powell Blvd., Portland, OR 97236
    If you're in the mood for a hike with some elevation, Powell Butte Nature Park is an excellent choice. The park is located on an extinct cinder cone volcano, with about 600 feet of elevation to hike before you reach the highest point. There are a variety of trails here to choose from, and watching the sunrise from the top of an extinct volcano is one Portland experience that you won't want to miss.

  • Mt. Tabor Park – SE 60th Ave. & SE Salmon St., Portland, OR 97215
    Why settle for one hike on a cinder cone volcano when you can have two? Mt. Tabor Park is also located on a volcanic cinder cone, with paved trails that help you travel the 636 feet of elevation until you reach the top. This park offers some of the best views of the Portland skyline that you'll find anywhere, making it a great place to capture some sunrise photos during your hike.

  • Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge – SE Sellwood Blvd. & SE 7th Ave., Portland, OR 97202
    For a sunrise hike with a side of bird watching, try a trip to Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge. The refuge features a 2.3-mile loop trail that offers excellent views of the blue herons that like to congregate here and allows you to watch the sunrise over the marsh. There are dozens of other species of birds to spot as you hike, with different species to see depending on what time of year you visit.

  • Forest Park – Portland, OR 97231
    With more than 40 access points located around Portland, 80 miles of trails, and over 5,200 acres to explore, Forest Park is one of the largest urban parks in the world. There's a trail here for hikers of every experience level, and the Trail Map makes it easy to find an access point to Forest Park near your home. With hilly, occasionally steep terrain, this park rewards your hiking effort with some of the best sunrise views in Portland. The longest trail at Forest Park is the 30-mile Wildwood Trail, which is recognized as a National Recreation Trail and connects with many of the park's access points.

  • Tom McCall Waterfront Park – 98 SW Naito Pkwy., Portland, OR 97204
    Located in the heart of downtown Portland along the Willamette River, Tom McCall Waterfront Park is a dog-friendly park ideal for a quick morning hike with your furry friend. While the scenery here is more urban than the other larger parks on our list, the waterfront views are still fantastic. There are also interactive fountains and splash pads perfect for keeping the kids entertained if you bring them along for your hike.

  • Hoyt Arboretum – 4000 SW Fairview Blvd., Portland, OR 97221
    Speaking of kid-friendly hiking destinations, Hoyt Arboretum offers a number of advantages if you're going for a sunrise hike with the whole family. The trails here are expansive, well-marked, and easy to traverse, making them ideal for young hikers. Hoyt Arboretum is home to more than 2,000 species of shrubs and trees, with educational signs that make it easy to teach your kids about each species. Watching the sunrise above the towering trees and lush green scenery is something that visitors of all ages can appreciate.

Searching for a home that makes it easy to enjoy the natural beauty of Portland? Our local team is here to help with all of your real estate needs. Contact us to buy and sell homes in the Portland, OR area.

July
11

Explore Portland: Get to Know the Pearl District

Portland Pearl District

Get to know the glittering jewel of Portland's incredible neighborhoods. Our brokers share their favorite must-see places in the chic and historic Pearl District.

History of the Pearl District

While the word "pearl" conjures up images of a shiny, polished gem, Portland's Pearl District was originally a gritty area that was home to railroads, warehouses, and industrial buildings. In the mid-1980s, urban renewal began transforming the neighborhood into a popular district known for art galleries, charming boutiques, and trendy restaurants.

At one time, the district was known simply as the Triangle, but a search began for a more satisfying name. The Rose Arts Magazine presented a list of suggestions, and the Pearl District ended up gaining favor as a reference to the artists who were setting up studios in warehouses being converted to lofts.

Activities

  • Jamison Square - 810 NW 11th Ave., Portland, OR 97209
    Green spaces were a major part of the plan for the Pearl District, and the best-known may be Jamison Square. This pocket-sized park, just under one acre, is a favorite of families because of its centerpiece fountain. Designed to replicate a tidal pool, the fountain features a waterfall that cascades into a continually refilling basin. Park hours are 5 a.m. -  midnight daily. 

  • First Thursday - NW 13th Ave. & NW Irving St., Portland, OR 97210
    First Thursday
    is one of three monthly art walks held in Portland. Artists are on hand at Pearl District galleries to discuss their work, as well as selling their pieces at street stands. Live music and refreshments complete the picture. Hours are 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. and admission is free.

Shops

  • Powell's City of Books - 1005 W. Burnside St., Portland, OR 97209
    Founded in 1971, Powell's City of Books is a true Portland landmark. The store takes up an entire city block with nine color-coded rooms that encompass more than 3,500 different sections. Book lovers from around the country flock to the Rare Book Room, which includes autographed first editions and other items of interest. Powell's is open seven days a week from 10 a.m. - 9 p.m.

  • Recycled Chic Boutique - 239 NW 13th Ave., Suite 209, Portland, OR 97209
    It's no surprise that Portland residents want to look stylish while still observing their commitment to the environment. Recycled Chic Boutique offers a thoughtfully curated selection of gently-used designer clothing and accessories, from casual streetwear to high fashion. You're likely to find brands such as Alexander McQueen, Burberry, and Jimmy Choo represented. Hours are noon - 4 p.m. on weekdays.

Dining

  • Fuller's Coffee Shop - 136 NW 9th Ave., Portland, OR 97209
    Tradition is alive and well in the Pearl District at Fuller's Coffee Shop. This old-school diner opened in 1947 and still retains the delightful retro ambiance. Instead of booths or tables, take a seat at the classic U-shaped counters with swivel stools. Breakfast is served all day, as well as comfort food favorites such as BLTs, burgers, and egg salad sandwiches. Fuller's is open 7 a.m. - 2 p.m. daily except Sunday when starting time is 8 a.m. 

  • Oven and Shaker - 1134 NW Everett St., Portland, OR 97209
    Pizza may be considered casual food, but it's serious business at Oven and Shaker. Chef Cathy Whims, a multiple James Beard award nominee, was inspired by numerous trips to Italy. Oven and Shaker's pizza begins with their signature 70-year-old sourdough starter and features fresh local ingredients for the toppings. Pies are hand-tossed and fired in a Milanese wood-burning oven that was transported brick-by-brick from Europe. Hours are 4 p.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 4 p.m. - 10 p.m. Friday, noon - 10 p.m. Saturday, and noon - 9 p.m. Sunday.

Entertainment

  • Portland Center Stage - 128 NW 11th Ave., Portland, OR 97209
    From its origins as a branch of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Portland Center Stage has grown to become one of the top 20 regional theaters in the country. In addition to plays, Center Stage hosts events such as art exhibits, improv shows, and live music. 

  • The Big Legrowlski - 812 NW Couch St., Portland, Or 97209
    At The Big Legrowlski shows are on every night, featuring the best local musicians, open jams, and dance parties with top DJs. Hours are 7 p.m. - midnight Sunday through Thursday and 6 p.m. - midnight Wednesday through Saturday. Showtime is 7 p.m. Cover charge runs $5-$10, with no cover for open jams.

No one knows Portland homes for sale like our cheerful and experienced brokers. Contact us at Coldwell Banker Bain to learn more.

June
27

Get to Know Portland Community Gardens

Portland Community Gardens

Portland is affectionately known as Rose City, but the local landscape produces an amazing range of plants, flowers, fruits, and vegetables.

Nature and community are two of the most cherished aspects in Portland, so it's easy to see why these things combine at local community gardens.

Our brokers take a look at the ever-growing (no pun intended!) network of community gardens around Portland homes for sale and let you know how you can get involved.

Community Gardens

In 1975, city leaders got the ball rolling with the Community Gardens program. Residents team up with Portland Parks & Recreation employees to create and nurture 58 gardens throughout the city, with some welcome physical activity and social interaction as a bonus.

Each year, plots are assigned between February and June, with a limit of one plot per household. One person is designated as the primary gardener, who is expected to complete at least half the work on their household's plot.

Plot sizes run from 50 to 800 square feet, along with a smaller ADA-accessible raised bed. Annual fees are determined on a sliding scale based on household size and income, running between $5-$220. Scholarships covering up to 75 percent of the fees are available to qualified households.

In the spirit of cooperation, all gardeners complete a minimum of six hours of service per year on outside plots in their garden. Common tasks can include weeding the paths and fence lines or cleaning the tool shed.

Produce for People is a side project in which gardens contribute fruits and vegetables to local food banks and shelters. Produce grown in community gardens includes a variety of versatile, nutrient-rich foods such as tomatoes, green beans, winter squash, zucchini, collard greens, and cucumbers.

Friends of Portland Community Gardens

When budget cuts threatened to shut down the Community Gardens program in 1985, another group stepped in to form Friends of Portland Community Gardens. Like Community Gardens, the non-profit organization has a mission to promote the development of healthy food and community bonds.

FPCG does not have its own network of gardens. Rather, it functions as a support system for the city's program along with other non-Parks & Recreation gardens throughout Portland. This support takes the form of providing supplies, cash awards, fiscal sponsorships, and educational resources. Occasionally, as in the case of Crossroads Community Garden, FPCG will coordinate efforts of interested parties who want to create a new garden.

As with any non-profit, FPCG is dependent on volunteers. Supporters can sign up to work in the field or at special events. The organization also looks for help with committees like Finance, Fundraising, Volunteer Recruitment, and Marketing. Individual and family memberships are available for annual fees of $25 and $45, respectively.

Grow Portland

Grow Portland, founded in 2010, was initially built on the foundation so wonderfully established by Community Gardens and FPCG. Five years later, Grow Portland expanded on that mission by reaching out to the next generation of gardeners. 

When Grow Portland discovered that teachers wanted to offer garden-based education but lacked resources, the organization started programs to address the need. They later joined forces with Portland Earth, Art, & Agriculture Project to use gardens at public schools as an innovative way to teach kids about ecology, art, and food.

In the meantime, Grow Portland continues to support community gardening throughout the city. Their work is currently focused in East Portland.

Activities of Grow Portland have also placed an emphasis on refugees and immigrants. Expansion of community gardening access for this segment created an increase in "healing spaces" for families dealing with displacement and trauma. 

Results tell the story. According to studies of Grow Portland participants, 100 percent reported reduced levels of stress and increased physical activities, with greater consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables. Gardeners harvest an average of $500 worth of organic produce each year, for a significant financial savings. 

Want to support Grow Portland? The organization welcomes monthly and annual donations, and some companies have a matching program for charitable giving by employees.

Find out why life in Portland is all roses and no thorns. Contact us at Coldwell Banker Bain for more local intel as well as experienced help with all your real estate needs.

March
14

7 Things to do in Old Town Chinatown

Chinatown

You never run out of interesting things to see and do in Portland. Old Town Chinatown is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and offers some truly unique attractions in the Portland area. Our brokers love telling people about Portland and all it has to offer! Be sure to check out these 7 places in Old Town Chinatown. 

  1. Lan Su Chinese Garden - 239 NW Everett St, Portland, OR 97209
    A nod to Portland's Chinese heritage, the Lan Su Chinese Garden is a tranquil botanical garden in the heart of Old Town Chinatown. The garden was founded in 2000 in partnership with the city of Suzhou, which is Portland's sister city in China. In addition to its magnificent stonework and lush assortment of native Chinese plants and trees, the Lan Su Chinese Garden includes an authentic Chinese tea house, which is surrounded by beautiful foliage and water features. The garden is just minutes from many Portland homes for sale

  2. Portland Saturday Market - 2 SW Naito Pkwy, Portland, OR 97204
    Held every Saturday from March until Christmas, the Portland Saturday Market is the oldest continuously-operated outdoor market in the United States. Since 1974, it's been Portland's best destination for art, crafts, and freshly made food. The market overlooks the Willamette River, between the west side of the Burnside Bridge and the Old Town Archways. More than 250 vendors make visiting the Portland Saturday Market a fun, colorful, ever-changing experience. 

  3. Portland Oregon White Stag Sign - 70 NW Couch St, Portland, OR 97209
    The Portland Oregon White Stag Sign is easily one of the most iconic and often-photographed landmarks in Portland. The instantly-recognizable neon sign is perched atop the White Stag Building, overlooking the Burnside Bridge. Although it has changed a handful of times over the years since the sign was first illuminated in 1940, it remains one of the city's must-see attractions. You always know it's Christmastime in Portland when the White Stag sign is given its red nose for the season! 

  4. Portland Union Station - 800 NW 6th Ave, Portland, OR 97209
    Portland was a major West Coast boomtown in the late 1800s, and its rapid growth was spurred on even more by the arrival of the railroads. The Portland Union Station has served as the city's primary rail hub since it opened its doors on Valentine's day in 1896. To this day, it's an active railway station in addition to being a link to Oregon's past. Portland Union Station is known for its Romanesque clock tower, which is a fixture of the Old Town Chinatown skyline. 

  5. Dan and Louis Oyster Bar - 208 SW Ankeny St, Portland, OR 97204
    There are plenty of places in Old Town Chinatown to grab a drink and a bite to eat, but none offer a taste of Portland's history quite like Dan and Louis Oyster Bar. This beloved local watering hole and eatery has been in the same location since 1907 when it was first opened as City Oyster Co. by Louis C. Wachsmuth. The name was changed to Dan and Louis Oyster Bar after a newspaper article noted that Louis' son Dan was always there working. It's still one of the best places in Portland to enjoy happy hour drinks and shuck a few oysters. 

  6. Voodoo Doughnut - 22 SW 3rd Ave, Portland, OR 97204
    If Dan and Louis Oyster Bar represents Old Portland, then Voodoo Donut must represent New Portland. Offering an eclectic assortment of colorful, flavorful pastries, Voodoo Donut was a hole-in-the-wall joint known only to locals until 2009, when it blew up after being prominently featured on The Amazing Race. They're known for creative offerings like their raspberry-filled Voodoo Doll donut, complete with a pretzel "stake" through its heart. A lot of their donuts are vegan as well. 

  7. Oregon Maritime Museum - 198 SW Naito Pkwy, Portland, OR 97204
    The Oregon Maritime Museum is a unique, must-visit attraction on the Portland Waterfront. This floating museum is housed inside the Sternwheeler Portland, a historic steam-powered sternwheel tugboat docked on the Old Town Chinatown waterfront in the Willamette River. The fully-restored craft dates back to the turn of the 20th century, and its the last operational ship of its kind in the United States. The ship is open to the public on guided group tours and houses a wide range of artifacts and memorabilia in addition to the Sternwheeler itself. 

Looking for more information on Portland's distinctive neighborhoods and historic districts? Contact us today to learn more about life in Portland, and talk to our brokers about finding your dream home in the Portland area. 

February
28

5Ks to Run in the Portland Area

Portland Running

Running can be done anywhere, at your own pace, and with no special equipment, making it a nearly perfect form of exercise. Grab your running shoes and take in the amazing scenery at these upcoming 5K runs near Portland homes for sale

  • Rock Creek Trail 5K - Rock Creek Trail, NW West Union Rd. at NW Kahnetta Dr., Portland, OR 97229
    Why wait for a special occasion to work on your times? The weekly Rock Creek Trail 5K offers a chance to run in a beautiful setting while getting to know others in the community. Register online before your first run and receive a scannable barcode that can be used to track your results. Walkers and joggers are welcome to join in. Race time is 9 a.m. every Saturday, and there are no entry fees.

  • Shamrock Run - Tom McCall Waterfront Park, 98 NW Naito Pkwy., Portland, OR 97204
    Get ready for that green beer by burning some calories at the Shamrock Run. 2022 marks the 44th year of this signature event, which begins and ends at Tom McCall Waterfront Park, with its stunning city views. Along with a 5K, events include a 1K, 8K, 15K, half marathon, and walk to accommodate participants at all levels. Before the race, check out the Shamrock Fitness Fair, taking place at the Oregon Convention Center on Friday and Saturday. First start time is 8 a.m. on Sunday, March 13. Entry fees range from $40-$70.

  • TulipFest Run - Wooden Shoe Tulip Farm, 33814 S. Meridian Rd., Woodburn, OR 97013
    Colorful fields of flowers form an incredible backdrop for the TulipFest Run. This annual event is hosted by Wooden Shoe Tulip Farm, a charming spot that's just minutes from Woodburn homes for sale, as part of their Tulip Festival. In addition to the race, the six-week extravaganza includes hot air balloons, wine tasting, kids' activities, artisan craft booths, and food vendors. Choose from 5K and 10K run/walks and a half marathon, with a start time of 7:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 19. Entry fees are $45 for the 5K and 10K and $65 for the half-marathon.

  • Couve Clover Run - Vancouver Waterfront Park, 695 Waterfront Way, Vancouver, WA 98660
    "Couve" is a Portuguese word that translates to "spring greens." Usually, it refers to cabbage, but at the Couve Clover Run, "spring green" is the dress code. Participants are invited to don green attire, with a prize awarded for the most festive costume. The course passes by historic Officer's Row, Fort Vancouver, and other notable points right down the street from Vancouver homes for sale. Race distances are 3, 7, and 10 miles. Mark your calendar for 9 a.m. on Sunday, March 20. Entry fees range from $20-$90.

  • Oregon Brewery Running Series - Various locations
    With Portland's status as the epicenter of the craft beer industry, it was only a matter of time before these two favorite pastimes paired up in the Oregon Brewery Running Series. Multiple runs are scheduled monthly from February through November, with each one starting and ending at one of the top breweries around Portland. These non-timed fun runs are intended to promote family-friendly fitness activities, so they're perfect for novice runners. Unwind afterward with live music, giveaways, and other entertainment at that event's sponsoring brewery. Upcoming runs include Von Ebert Brewing on Saturday, March 5, and Oregon City Brewing on Saturday, March 19. Entry fees are $30, with season passes and multi-event packs available. 

  • Spring Classic Duathlon - Vancouver Lake Regional Park, 6801 NW Lower River Rd., Vancouver, WA 98660
    If you like variety in your workouts, the 38th annual Spring Classic Duathlon is for you. An invigorating 12-mile bike run is bookended by two 5K runs. Solo events include a 5K, 10K, and half marathon. Last year, the Duathlon returned to its original home at Vancouver Lake Regional Park, with its inspiring views of the lake along with Columbia River and Mount Hood. The post-race reward is a free beer and meal. The Spring Classic takes place at 7 a.m. on Sunday, April 24. Entry fees are $20-$180.

  • Cinco de Mayo Half Marathon - 9827 NE Sunderland Ave., Portland, OR 97211 
    It's a fiesta of fun at the Cinco de Mayo Half Marathon, a popular spring tradition in Portland. The course, which follows alongside the scenic Columbia River, includes 5K and 10K runs as well. Festivities are scheduled for 8 a.m. on Saturday, April 30. There are two types of registration packages, with early entry fees from $25-80 until March 4.

Need help buying or selling a home? Our brokers can help every step of the way! Contact us today at Coldwell Banker Bain.

January
10

Hidden Gems: Portland Parks to Visit

Portland Pocket Parks

Each year, visitors flock to the Pacific Northwest to take in the region's fabled sights. Even so, there are a number of delightful pockets of land, or pocket parks, around Portland homes for sale that manage to stay under the radar. Our brokers let you in on some of their favorite hidden gems in Portland.

  • Lovejoy Fountain Park - SW 3rd Ave. & Harrison St., Portland, OR 97204
    Need some time to get away from a hectic workday? Lovejoy Fountain Park is a secret oasis that sits below street level in the heart of downtown. The park's namesake, Asa Lawrence Lovejoy, was one of the earliest developers of the frontier town that became known as Portland. Life Magazine once described the park as "a piece of wilderness transplanted," with its centerpiece fountain and tree-lined borders. Lovejoy Fountain Park is open seven days a week from 5 a.m. - midnight.

  • Poet's Beach - South Waterfront Park, 2001 S. River Dr., Portland, OR 97201
    With a name like Poet's Beach, this hidden gem should be on everyone's must-see list. Located in South Waterfront Park, Poet's Beach sits on the west bank of the Willamette River, just north of the Marquam Bridge. The beach itself is small, but it offers some spectacular views. Swimming is allowed during summer, although there are no lifeguards on duty. Park hours are 5 a.m. - midnight daily.

  • Kelley Point Park - N. Marine Dr. & Lombard St., Portland, OR 97203
    Hall Jackson Kelley, a transplant from New England, was one of the more vocal supporters of the Pacific Northwest in the 19th century. He failed in his efforts to create a city at the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia Rivers, but the spot ultimately became Kelley Point Park. Situated on an isolated point of land, across from Sauvie Island, the dog-friendly park is worth a visit for the beautiful views from the vista point. Hours are 6 a.m. - 10 p.m. daily.

  • Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge - SE 7th Ave. & Sellwood Blvd., Portland, OR 97202
    Take the whole family on an outing to Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge, a fascinating real-life classroom that's the first facility of its kind in Portland. The 163 acres of meadows, wetlands, and woodlands support a wide range of fish and wildlife, including many that have been designated as "special status." Kids will have fun spotting quail, woodpeckers, great blue herons, and others from more than 175 species of birds that live on the grounds. Oak Bottom Wildlife Refuge is open daily from 5 a.m. - midnight.

  • Two Plum Park - 4057 NE 7th Ave., Portland, OR 97212
    At less than half an acre in size, Two Plum Park is truly a blink-and-you'll-miss-it parcel of land. But this tiny park, just big enough for a walking path and playground, serves as an enduring tribute to the power of community. When King neighborhood resident Joe King grew tired of the overgrown lot down the street, he started cleaning it up himself. Others joined in the project, and they ultimately convinced the city to turn it into a park, named for the two plum trees that grow there. Hours are 5 a.m. - midnight daily.

  • Leach Botanical Garden - 6704 SE 122nd Ave., Portland, OR 97236
    Leach Botanical Garden
    is the culmination of two love stories. Married in 1913, John and Lilla Leach remained together until John's death in 1972. During their long and successful marriage, Lilla discovered an interest in botany, which she pursued at their "Sleepy Hollow" home on Johnson Creek. The couple bequeathed the property to the City of Portland to be maintained as a botanical park and museum. Hours are 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. Admission is free, but donations are gratefully accepted.

  • Wishing Tree - 2954 NE 7th Ave., Portland, OR 97212
    While it may not technically fit the definition of a park, the Wishing Tree certainly merits a visit. In 2013, owner Nicole Helprin wrote out some wishes and hung them on the tree before leaving for a trip. Upon her return, she found the entire tree covered in wishes from others. The tradition continues to this day, and tags and markers are available to add your own wishes.

No matter what your lifestyle or background, you'll feel right at home in Portland. Contact us at Coldwell Banker Bain for help with your real estate needs. 

October
18

About the Pacific Crest Trail

Pacific Crest Trail

Spanning 2,650 miles from the Mexican border in the south to the Canadian border in the north, the Pacific Crest Trail is to the West Coast what the Appalachian Trail is to the East Coast. Our brokers take a look at this iconic hiking destination that's within convenient distance of Bend homes for sale.

History of the Pacific Crest Trail

The first seeds of the Pacific Crest Trail were planted right here in Oregon. Fred Cleator, a supervisor in the U.S. Forest Service, first mapped the state's Skyline Trail in 1920 and started plans for a similar route in Washington.

At the time, the Boy Scouts, Sierra Club, and other organizations were floating various ideas for hiking trails. In 1926, Catherine Montgomery, a teacher in Bellingham, WA, became the first to propose a contiguous hiking trail through the three West Coast states. 

Mountain League of Los Angeles chairman Clinton C. Clarke was inspired to unite these groups into one cohesive effort when he organized the Pacific Crest Trail System Conference in 1932. The conference, which counted legendary nature photographer Ansel Adams among its committee members, led to Clarke becoming known as the father of the Pacific Crest Trail.

Finally, during President Lyndon B. Johnson's administration, Congress passed the National Trails System Act on October 2, 1968. In addition to setting forth the administrative framework for a nationwide system of trails, this officially named the Pacific Crest Trail and the Appalachian Trail as the country's first scenic trails. 

Fun Facts About the Pacific Crest Trail

  • At loose ends after the death of her mother, writer Cheryl Strayed began a journey on the Pacific Crest Trail despite no previous hiking experience. Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail details the highs and lows of her 1,100-mile journey. The memoir, along with the movie adapted from the book and starring Reese Witherspoon, created a spike of interest in the Pacific Crest Trail.

  • Anyone hiking or horseback riding 500 miles or more in a continuous trip must obtain a permit. While there is no charge for a permit, they are issued on a first-come-first-served basis and limited by quota. Day and overnight use permits are also required in 33 places along the Pacific Crest Trail, including Crater Lake National Park, Mount Jefferson Wilderness, and Three Sisters Wilderness in Oregon.

  • How long does it take to traverse the entire length of the Pacific Crest Trail? While some elite athletes have accomplished it in as little as two months, the average time is approximately five months. Expenses run anywhere from $4,000-$8,000, depending on how frugal or extravagant a hiker chooses to be.

  • While no formal statistics are currently kept, the self-reported "2,600 Miler List" includes 7,936 people, 100 of whom have completed the trail more than once. The annual number peaked in 2018 when 1,185 completions were reported. Total number of permits issued for all usage has grown from 1,879 in 2013 to 7,888 in 2019.

Pacific Crest Trail Hikes Near Bend

  • Experienced hikers who are up for a challenge are rewarded with spectacular views after reaching the summit of Diamond Peak, one of Oregon's Matterhorns. The 13.8-mile dog-friendly trail is described as a "scramble," which is the term for a route that's more difficult than regular hiking but not quite to the level of rock-climbing. Unlike most mountains that are relatively symmetrical, Diamond Peak has a jagged profile that's been compared to the back of a stegosaurus. 

  • Twin Peaks, more familiarly known as the Twins, is a volcano that gained its name from the dual summits formed by a gap in the crater rim. This 6.7-mile dog-friendly route crosses the Pacific Crest Trail on its way to views of both Twins along with Mount Jefferson, Mount McLaughlin, and other parts of the Cascades. The real showstopper is Waldo Lake, a popular Oregon attraction that's the second-largest natural freshwater lake in the state behind Crater Lake.

  • North, Middle, and South make up the Three Sisters that are the centerpiece of the eponymous Wilderness Area. Skirt the permit requirement by hiking the Scott Trail, a dog-friendly route marked by alpine meadows full of wildflowers. Along with the Three Sisters, the summit features views of Collier Glacier, the largest glacier in Oregon, situated between North and Middle Sisters.

The best part of any journey is returning to your dream home in Bend. Whether you're buying or selling a house, contact us at Coldwell Banker Bain for cheerful and professional help with Bend real estate.

August
2

Outdoor Movies Now Showing Near the Portland Area

Outdoor Movies

Summer is the perfect time to enjoy an outdoor movie with friends, and there are a wide variety of options available to watch outdoor films in the Portland area. Many local communities make movies available for free in weekly events at popular local parks, and some even offer the classic drive-in movie experience. If you're planning to enjoy an outdoor movie, remember that it's wise to bring your own seating, along with some snacks and drinks. Our brokers have the details on 5 communities in the Portland area showing outdoor movies this summer.

Outdoor Movies Now Showing Near the Portland Area

  • Rooftop Cinema at Lloyd Center – 2201 Lloyd Center, Portland, OR 97232
    Some of the usual outdoor movie events near Portland, OR homes for sale have been put on hold for summer 2021, but the Rooftop Cinema at Lloyd Center is still here to offer a movie experience unlike any other. There are different movies showing every Friday, Saturday, and Sunday in August, with the schedule trimming down to every Saturday and Sunday in September. Be sure to order your tickets ahead of time because advance tickets get priority seating on movie nights.

  • Lake Oswego Movies in the Park – 200 1st St., Lake Oswego, OR 97034
    Millennium Plaza Park is one of the most popular parks near Lake Oswego, OR, homes for sale, and it's also where you'll find the Movies in the Park series this summer. The next big movie on the schedule is "Moana," which will be showing on August 10. While this event is totally free to attend, registration is required. Make sure that you register beforehand and that everyone in your group is registered in order to make your experience as enjoyable as possible.

  • West Linn Movies at Tanner Creek Park – 3456 Parker Rd., West Linn, OR 97068
    Enjoy a busy schedule of family-friendly movies on Wednesday nights when you attend West Linn Movies at Tanner Creek Park. August features a busy schedule of movies at Tanner Creek Park, with "Moana" showing on August 4, the classic "The Goonies" on tap for August 11, and "Toy Story 4" to wrap up the summer movies series on August 18. The movies begin shortly after dusk and are free for everyone to enjoy. Stop by after checking out West Linn homes for sale

  • Vancouver Friday Night Movies in the Parks – New Location Every Friday
    The parks near Vancouver, WA homes for sale will be popular destinations for movie lovers all summer long, with the Friday Night Movies in the Parks series happening in a different park every weekend. Upcoming movies include "Wonder Woman 1984" at Washington School Park (August 6), "Frozen II" at Hearthwood Park (August 13), "Onward" at Bagley Community Park (August 20), and "Scoob!" at Oakbrook Park (August 27). There's no admission fee, but visitors are encouraged to bring their own seating and snacks.

  • North Clackamas Drive-In Movies – 7300 SE Harmony Rd., Milwaukie, OR 97222
    Head south of Portland and get the best of both worlds by enjoying an outdoor movie from the comfort of your own car when you visit the North Clackamas Drive-In Movies series in Milwaukie. The series takes place on Saturday nights throughout the summer, with movies starting around dusk. Make sure to register ahead of time if you plan to attend this event, then get ready to enjoy movies like "Night at the Museum," which is playing on August 7 at the North Clackamas Aquatic Park.

Searching for a home close to all of the outdoor attractions and fun community events around Portland? Our team is here to help. Contact us to buy and sell homes throughout the Portland, OR area.

July
12

Picnic Spots Throughout Seattle

Picnic Spots Throughout Seattle

With a city surrounded by water and mountains, is it any wonder that outdoor dining is so popular in Seattle? Pack a basket or grab some carryout and visit one of these amazing picnic spots around Seattle recommended by our brokers

  • Waterfall Garden Park - 219 2nd Ave. S., Seattle, WA 98104
    An urban picnic area may sound like an oxymoron, but Seattle is full of such unconventional delights. Waterfall Garden Park is tucked into an unobtrusive 60-by-80-feet spot in historic Pioneer Square. Until 1975, the site held the headquarters of United Parcel Service. Today, the charming park includes a 22-foot man-made waterfall and a dual-level patio with tables and chairs, making it a wonderful place for a lunch hour picnic or reading break. Park hours are 8 a.m. - 3:45 p.m. daily.

  • Green Lake Park - 7201 E. Green Lake Dr., Seattle, WA 98115
    The area around Green Lake Park features some of the most desirable Seattle homes for sale, and it's not hard to see why. Who wouldn't want to live just down the street from a beautiful three-acre lake surrounded by lush green space? The neighborhood is full of great restaurants, delis, and sandwich shops where you can pick up a picnic-friendly meal. Work up an appetite or work off some calories with swimming at the lifeguard-patrolled beach or a walk along the 2.8-mile path that circles the lake. Bring along a guidebook to identify the numerous birds and waterfowl you're sure to see. Green Lake Park is open 24/7.

  • Dr. Jose Rizal Park - 1007 12th Ave. S., Seattle, WA 98144
    Seattle has one of the most iconic skylines in the country. Take in some incredible views of downtown and Puget Sound during your picnic at Dr. Jose Rizal Park on Beacon Hill. With nearly 10 acres of grounds, including reservable picnic areas, the park can accommodate groups of any size. Be sure to bring Fido along and spend some quality time at the off-leash dog area. Park hours are 4 a.m. - 11:30 p.m., seven days a week.

  • Gas Works Park - 2101 N. Northlake Way, Seattle, WA 98103
    When someone in Seattle says, "Go fly a kite," people immediately head to Gas Works Park. The 19.1-acre site, once the home of the Seattle Gas Light Company plant, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Kite-flying on the park's spacious hills is a local ritual, while remnants of the original facility are incorporated into a play barn that's a favorite of families. Watch seaplanes land and take off from Lake Union against the backdrop of the downtown skyline. Gas Works Park is open daily from 6 a.m. - 10 p.m.

  • Washington Park Arboretum - 2300 Arboretum Dr. E., Seattle, WA 98112
    Nature is on display in all its glory at Washington Park Arboretum, a 230-acre extravaganza of gardens, wetlands, and wooded areas. The grounds contain 5,500 different plants from all corners of the world, including one of the top Japanese maple tree collections. Choose your favorite points of interest and create your own walking tour along the numerous trails. Print one of the seasonal scavenger hunts from the website and see how many items kids can find. Leashed dogs are welcome at the arboretum. Hours are dawn - 8 p.m. daily, and admission is free.

  • Carkeek Park - 950 NW Carkeek Park Rd., Seattle, WA 98177
    Washington state is known for apples because of spots like historic Piper's Orchard in Carkeek Park. Six miles of trails lead to the orchard, as well as spectacular views of Whidbey Island and the Olympic Mountains. The salmon-themed playground plays tribute to another notable product of the state. Check out the tide pool beach at low tide, when you can walk hundreds of feet out into Puget Sound. Park hours are 6 a.m. - 10 p.m. daily.

  • Woodland Park Rose Garden - 750 N. 50th St., Seattle, WA 98103
    With 2.5 acres filled with nearly 3,000 roses, Woodland Park Rose Garden is perfect for a romantic picnic for two or a delightful family outing. The garden is one of only two dozen American Rose Test Gardens in the country, displaying new hybrids before they're available to the public. Fun fact: since the garden went pesticide-free in 2006, the flowers have been used to feed animals in adjoining Woodland Park Zoo. Hours are 7 a.m. - 10 p.m. daily, and admission is free.

Picnics don't get more exclusive than the ones you hold in the backyard of your Seattle home. Have questions about buying or selling real estate? Contact us at Coldwell Banker Bain for cheerful and experienced help.

Disclaimer: All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. All properties are subject to prior sale, change or withdrawal. Neither listing broker(s) or information provider(s) shall be responsible for any typographical errors, misinformation, misprints and shall be held totally harmless. Listing(s) information is provided for consumers personal, non-commercial use and may not be used for any purpose other than to identify prospective properties consumers may be interested in purchasing. Information on this site was last updated 08/13/2022. The listing information on this page last changed on 08/13/2022. The data relating to real estate for sale on this website comes in part from the Internet Data Exchange program of RMLS (last updated Fri 08/12/2022 8:34:57 PM EST) or Willamette Valley MLS (last updated Fri 08/12/2022 11:51:39 PM EST) or COAR/MLSCO (last updated Fri 08/12/2022 11:31:24 PM EST) or NWMLS (last updated Sat 08/13/2022 8:04:17 AM EST). Real estate listings held by brokerage firms other than Coldwell Banker Bain may be marked with the Internet Data Exchange logo and detailed information about those properties will include the name of the listing broker(s) when required by the MLS. All rights reserved. --

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